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News and Information from the top of winter wonderland.


Steamboat's 40th Annual Cowboy Downhill

Sunday, January 19, 2014


         Photo courtesy of Steamboat.com

Beyond the serene wilderness we enjoy, our Western culture is another unique characteristic of the Steamboat area. If you're in town this evening, check out the Cowboy Up Party and Balloon Glow at Steamboat Mountain Village. At 5 p.m., six hot air balloons will light up the Steamboat sky from the ski base area. You can take a close look at the beautiful, colorful balloons, or hop on one to be transported to mountain dining. At 6 p.m., ProRodeo cowboys will gather at Bear River Bar & Grill at the ski area base for the Cowboy Up Party and music by Georgia-based folk band Banks & Shane. The cowboys will be "cowboying up" for tomorrow's 40th annual Cowboy Downhill at Steamboat's ski area. On Jan. 20 at 1 p.m., more than 100 ProRodeo cowboys will compete in slalom events and a "stampede" while duded up in their cowboy hats, chaps and full regalia. Olympic champion and Steamboat Director of Skiing Billy Kidd and six-time All-Around World Champion cowboy Larry Mahan came up with the competition 40 years ago, and it remains a signature Steamboat event. Following the Cowboy Downhill stampede, Waylon Jennings' son Shooter will play country and Southern rock at the base area. Steamboat's Western roots provide lots of activities to fill your time around snowmobiling - come join us!


Steamboat Snowmobile Tours featured in Afar Magazine

Tuesday, December 24, 2013


                    Photo courtesy of Afar.com

Afar Magazine sent New York-based reporter Ashley Castle to Steamboat Springs earlier this month for the article "A Perfect Week in Steamboat Springs, Colorado." Ashley noted Steamboat Snowmobile Tours as a major highlight of her trip and aptly titled the segment "Live Adventurously." The article has great ideas for places to visit while you're in Steamboat, including cowboy outfitter F.M. Light & Sons, Strawberry Park Hot Springs and Steamboat Mountain. Check out Ashley's Instagram for more cool pictures of her snowmobile adventure. Thanks to Afar for the exciting piece and to Ashley for taking a tour with us. We love helping all our guests "Live Adventurously."

Our Cabin: The First Step in Your Adventure

Monday, December 23, 2013


After arriving at Steamboat Snowmobile Tours, the first step of your adventure is getting situated at our toasty cabin in Routt National Forest. The small building is one of a limited number of buildings allowed on Routt National Forest land, and it exists through a grandfather provision. Because it was built without toilet facilities, portable toilets have been placed shortly outside the cabin for our guests and staff.


Once inside the cabin, you'll check in, fill out a waiver form, meet with your guide and get fitted for a helmet, which is required by the Department of Transportation. You may leave anything that you don't care to take on the tour inside the cabin. There are no lockers, so we discourage you from leaving any valuables. However, the cabin is always manned by members of our staff.


Inside the cabin, you can also take advantage of several complimentary items for use during your tour including:


  1. - Full body suits
  2. - Boots
  3. - Hats
  4. - Goggles
  5. - Handwarmers


You may also help yourself to complimentary hot chocolate, cider and tea before and after your tour.


There are granola bars, candy bars and other snacks available for purchase, in addition to Steamboat Snowmobile Tours baseball caps and kids T-shirts. You may also purchase a face mask. Many of our guests have recommended a face mask to protect from blowing snow and wind while snowmobiling.


If you have any questions about what to wear or how to otherwise prepare for your tour, please take a look at Advice for First-Time Riders or call us at 970-879-6500.


We can't wait to see you!



The Steamboat Powder Experience

Friday, December 20, 2013

Snowmobiling in Northwest Colorado's Routt National Forest gives you a powder experience unique to this part of North America. Powder is defined as freshly fallen, uncompacted snow, and the powder in our area is prized for its low moisture content (about 6 percent, compared with 10 percent for most other mountains). Our powder is so dry due to the way winter storms make their way to the Steamboat Springs area from the Pacific Northwest. Clouds of supercooled water blow in from the ocean and travel about 1,200 miles east through Oregon, Idaho, Nevada and Utah. The supercooled water remains a liquid despite being colder than the freezing point. The clouds encounter cold temperatures in the lower troposphere – about 2,000 to 2,500 miles above the Earth. At these elevations, the wet clouds see their moisture attach to dust, creating large snowflakes known as stellar dendrites. When the clouds run into the Park Range encompassing the Steamboat area, they are forced above the mountains and cool. The clouds lose their moisture, sending us dry stellar dendrites that characterize our amazing powder. 


For snowmobilers, the powder will blow around you in a glittering, snowglobe-like wonderland as you and your guide sled through Routt National Forest. Snowmobiling allows us to take you to places you could not otherwise reach during the winter, to see sights that few people get to enjoy, all while having a powder experience available nowhere else. Come join us and see for yourself what makes the Steamboat Snowmobiling Tours adventure so unique.


Rabbit Ears Peak

Friday, December 13, 2013


One of the amazing sights you’ll see on your Steamboat Snowmobile Tours adventure is a one-of-a-kind view of Rabbit Ears Peak. The peak features twin volcanic outcrops that were formed by layers of extruded volcanic rock that rose to the earth's surface between 33 and 23 million years ago, and were eroded to form the two “rabbit ears.” Each rabbit ear is about 100 feet fall, and climbing them is allowed but dangerous due to crumbling volcanic rock. An old rope greets those who attempt to climb the higher, non-split ear, and a metal marker reading “10,654 feet” awaits those who reach the top. Rabbit Ears Peak is visible from the east side of Rabbit Ears Pass when the skies are clear, and the peak was used as a landmark by Native Americans, trappers, mountain men and early frontier settlers. Today, the Rabbit Ears are a welcoming greeting that lets travelers know that they are getting closer to beautiful Steamboat Springs, Colorado.




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