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News and Information from the top of winter wonderland.


SST Helps with Jeep Wrangler Polar Edition Commercial

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Jeep chose the home base of Steamboat Snowmobile Tours to show off the capabilities of its new 2014 Jeep Wrangler Polar Edition. When Jeep and its film crew visited SST in December, our staff helped clear out areas of the Routt National Forest for the Wrangler to traverse. We commend Jeep for choosing our home, one of the most consistently snowy areas in North America, to test the Polar Edition. Check out the commercial above for a quick view of SST country.

Steamboat Snowmobile Tours is in "Colorado’s Snowfall Capital"

Thursday, December 26, 2013

   One of our guides shoveling in the Park Range mountains on Christmas Eve

In addition to the special nature of the snow Steamboat receives, the volume is another amazing quality. The Park Range mountains, where we conduct our tours, receive the most winter precipitation in all of Colorado. The reason the Park Range receives the most precipitation is due to the way rain or snow is generated by mountains through orographic precipitation. Orographic precipitation is a term for the process by which moist air is forced up the slopes of mountains to produce rain or snow. Snowfall in our area is the result of storms that originate over the Pacific Ocean and travel inland, producing orographic precipitation in the mountains of California, Utah and Wyoming before reaching Colorado. Fortunately for us, there is a gap of relatively low terrain before Pacific storms reach the northern Colorado mountains. This results in moisture-rich clouds running perpendicularly into the Park Range, where they dump the brunt of their precipitation before traveling on. For a more thorough explanation of this phenomena, please take a look at the research paper “Why is the Park Range Colorado’s Snowfall Capital?” in Colorado Climate. Otherwise, you can come see us – we’d love to show you our record-breaking volume of snow firsthand.

Rabbit Ears Peak

Friday, December 13, 2013


One of the amazing sights you’ll see on your Steamboat Snowmobile Tours adventure is a one-of-a-kind view of Rabbit Ears Peak. The peak features twin volcanic outcrops that were formed by layers of extruded volcanic rock that rose to the earth's surface between 33 and 23 million years ago, and were eroded to form the two “rabbit ears.” Each rabbit ear is about 100 feet fall, and climbing them is allowed but dangerous due to crumbling volcanic rock. An old rope greets those who attempt to climb the higher, non-split ear, and a metal marker reading “10,654 feet” awaits those who reach the top. Rabbit Ears Peak is visible from the east side of Rabbit Ears Pass when the skies are clear, and the peak was used as a landmark by Native Americans, trappers, mountain men and early frontier settlers. Today, the Rabbit Ears are a welcoming greeting that lets travelers know that they are getting closer to beautiful Steamboat Springs, Colorado.




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